gingerin-thetardis:

"Raven what’s on your face.

It is me”

(Source: liveandletflyy, via sparrowwitharrows)

makeitearlgrey:

blushpanic:

genji-senpai:

pezberry93:

Alternative phrases to “calm your tits”

hakuna your tatas omg

DonT HAVE A RACK ATTACK OMFG

I am officially changing to “undo the calamities that are in you mammaries”

makeitearlgrey:

blushpanic:

genji-senpai:

pezberry93:

Alternative phrases to “calm your tits”

hakuna your tatas omg

DonT HAVE A RACK ATTACK OMFG

I am officially changing to “undo the calamities that are in you mammaries”

(via nicotine-and-rocknroll)

(Source: unheat, via snoozies)

phobias:

i need a cuddle buddy, must be ok with listening to my music and spending 13 hours in bed together

(via sereneflaws)

extrasad:

i am dumb

extrasad:

i am dumb

(via extrasad)

(Source: c-reaven, via c-i-g-a-r-r-o-s)

boldahzlove:

The Fault In Our Stars | via Tumblr en We Heart It.

boldahzlove:

The Fault In Our Stars | via Tumblr en We Heart It.

(via equestrianfangirlswag)

(Source: relahvant, via fuckingsession)

(via natloko)

moon-meadows:

willowbambi:

Ok well this is the best photo ever

hands down

moon-meadows:

willowbambi:

Ok well this is the best photo ever

hands down

(Source: direwolfves, via swag-canada)

generalelectric:

“We have a hunger of the mind which asks for knowledge of all around us, and the more we gain, the more is our desire; the more we see, the more we are capable of seeing.” 
Maria Mitchell is known as the first professional female astronomer in the United States. On October 1, 1847, she peered through her family’s telescope and “swept around for comets,” as she did every night it was clear. But that night she became the first woman in the U.S. to discover one. She later became the first Astronomy professor at Vassar College, where she would often ask her students, “Did you learn that in a book or observe it yourself?” 

generalelectric:

“We have a hunger of the mind which asks for knowledge of all around us, and the more we gain, the more is our desire; the more we see, the more we are capable of seeing.” 

Maria Mitchell is known as the first professional female astronomer in the United States. On October 1, 1847, she peered through her family’s telescope and “swept around for comets,” as she did every night it was clear. But that night she became the first woman in the U.S. to discover one. She later became the first Astronomy professor at Vassar College, where she would often ask her students, “Did you learn that in a book or observe it yourself?” 

(Source: aps.org)